Sockeye salmon moving upriver in Adams River

in Leisure

About 15,000 people have traveled to British Columbia in Canada to watch one of the mysterious nature phenomena. It is the sockeye salmon moving upriver on October 10th that was reported to be in record numbers in a recent century. Between six to eight million salmon are estimated to come to Adams River in the Shuswap area of British Columbia to mate and die at the end of their four-year lifespan. This year, as many as 70,000 visitors from all over the world will travel to Adams River to witness these six million fish. Red salmon attempt to make their way further upstream to find clean gravel and fresh running water where they can lay eggs to be fertilized. After taking their one big chance at mating, the crimson fish will lose their color and die.

 


Adams River is located in the mountains of Western Canada about 4.5 hours driving distance from Vancouver

Adams River is located in the mountains of Western Canada about 4.5 hours driving distance from Vancouver

 


A lot of tourists are watching sockeye salmon move along a creek

A lot of tourists are watching sockeye salmon move along a creek

 


The fish come here to mate and die. This year\'s numbers are estimated to be around 6 million.

The fish come here to mate and die. This year\'s numbers are estimated to be around 6 million.

 


Sockeye salmon moving upriver attracts a lot of visitors and photographers to British Columbia

Sockeye salmon moving upriver attracts a lot of visitors and photographers to British Columbia

 


Millions of red salmon swimming upstream produce a carpet of red under the shallow water.

Millions of red salmon swimming upstream produce a carpet of red under the shallow water.

 


A sockeye salmon is spawning between the branches of a fallen cedar tree

A sockeye salmon is spawning between the branches of a fallen cedar tree

 


This spectacular wildlife event occurs once every 4 years

This spectacular wildlife event occurs once every 4 years

 


Record numbers of red salmon congregate along the Adam\'s River in the Shuswap area of British Columbia on Sunday October 10th, 2010.

Record numbers of red salmon congregate along the Adams River in the Shuswap area of British Columbia on Sunday October 10th, 2010.

 


Salmon skeleton is spotted on the bank of Huihill Creek near the Adams River

Salmon skeleton is spotted on the bank of Huihill Creek near the Adams River

 


Dead sockeye salmon litter on the shore while tourists are gathering to admire this event

Dead sockeye salmon litter on the shore while tourists are gathering to admire this event

 


Dead sockeye salmon lies along the Adams River. The smell of dying salmon attracts bears.

Dead sockeye salmon lies along the Adams River. The smell of dying salmon attracts bears.


     

 

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Elizabeth Woods has 378 articles online and 9 fans

I am an internet marketer and freelance photographer. I maintain various sites and blogs with a large audience. My hobby is collecting photographs of celebrities and writing comments on outstanding events in the field of entertainment.

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Sockeye salmon moving upriver in Adams River

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This article was published on 2010/10/13